More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items.



The Valais region encompasses Switzerland's most rugged terrain. Our coverage extends from the gateway city of Geneva to the upper reaches of the Walliser Alps along the Italian frontier. Visitors are apt to enter the region in Geneva, a small, cosmopolitan city between the border of France and the western end of Lake Geneva, known in French as Lac Leman. The city bustles with the business of international organizations, plays along a garden-lined lakefront, and harbors a pleasant pedestrian old town. The city of Lausanne lies across the lake, drawing visitors for its own pleasant lakefront and the Olympic Games History Museum. Beyond, in the Valais region, protrudes the magnificent Matterhorn Peak, with famed Zermatt at its foot and secluded Saas-Fee just over the hill. In southeastern Switzerland next to the border of Italy, Zermatt reclines amid a cluster of 38 4,000-m peaks. Above the town towers the distinctive hook of the Matterhorn crest. For most visitors, Zermatt isn't a place to relax; it's a place to play, and play hard. About 400 km of hiking paths wind through the mountains above Zermatt, most areas well-served by cableway or mountain train. The most spectacular of the trails run through the Sunnegga and Rothorn areas, winding around lakes, skirting glaciers, and all within view of the Matterhorn across the valley. One of these, the Marmot Trail, leads from mid-mountain Rothorn at Blauherd down to Sunnegga via a path lined with several marmot family groups. Walkers wanting a closer look at the majestic mountain should try the new Matterhorn Trail. It drops from the lift station at Schwarzsee, along the foot of the Matterhorn to Stafel, to the lake at Zmutt, and then down to the lift station at Furi passing several inviting mountain huts along the way. Saas-Fee lies to the east of Zermatt, on the opposite side of the towering Dom. Like Zermatt, the resort is reached via a climb up the forked valley south of Visp to reach Saas-Fee, drivers at Stalden take the lft fork toward Saastal instead of the right fork toward Täsch. (Although only a few km apart as-the-crow-flies, the drive between Saas-Fee and Zermatt takes around an hour.) Also like Zermatt, the village of Saas-Fee is technically car-free, served only by a swarm of electric taxi carts. The swarm here, however, is considerably smaller and less menacing. Drivers park in the nine-story cliff-side garage on the village edge and, from the garage loading bays, telephone hotels for pickup. (Visitors arriving by train must bus in from Brig or Visp.) Guests here split into two distinct camps those who've come for the small-resort exclusivity, and those who've come for the big-mountain recreation. Both camps enjoy the views from the Allalin, where the world's highest revolving restaurant, the Drehrestaurant Metro-Alpin, does a full rotation each hour. Steps away, adventurers stroll through the largest ice pavilion in the world (the Mittelallin Eispavillon), a cave carved out of the glacier and embellished with sculptures and a chapel. At the heart of the Alps lies Switzerland; at the heart of Switzerland lies the Jungfrau region; and at the heart of the Jungfrau lies Interlaken. Tucked away in what is arguably the most spectacular Alpine scenery in the world, Interlaken enjoys renown for its diversity of outdoor adventures and its role as the Jungfrau region's mountain transportation hub. It's an inviting town a busy, bustling place with back alleys few tourists take time to explore. These are just a few of the Swiss gems explored in this guide, equivalent to 160 print pages and loaded with detail on all the restaurants, hotels, shops and activities you'll want to know about. Plus, there are maps and photos throughout. This is an excerpt from the much larger Adventure Guide to the Alps, which runs 500 pages in print, and covers the German, French, Austrian and Italian Alps as well.

People who read this also enjoyed

Get a 1 year subscription
for / issue

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • IOS