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How the mystery of the Bible's greatest story shaped geology: a MacArthur Fellow presents a surprising perspective on Noah's Flood.

In Tibet, geologist David R. Montgomery heard a local story about a great flood that bore a striking similarity to Noah’s Flood. Intrigued, Montgomery began investigating the world’s flood stories and—drawing from historic works by theologians, natural philosophers, and scientists—discovered the counterintuitive role Noah’s Flood played in the development of both geology and creationism. Steno, the grandfather of geology, even invoked the Flood in laying geology’s founding principles based on his observations of northern Italian landscapes. Centuries later, the founders of modern creationism based their irrational view of a global flood on a perceptive critique of geology. With an explorer’s eye and a refreshing approach to both faith and science, Montgomery takes readers on a journey across landscapes and cultures. In the process we discover the illusive nature of truth, whether viewed through the lens of science or religion, and how it changed through history and continues changing, even today.

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The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood
Average rating
4.7 / 5
January 24th, 2014
This is a very interesting book explaining how geological features on the Earth took millions of years to form. The author compares this to the influence which the story of Noah's flood has had over many centuries. It's a very good historical and cultural overview of geology and its interaction with the Judeo-Christian flood story. The author also discusses flood stories from around the world throughout history. The author is straightforward and clear that the Noah's flood story is not providing a scientific explanation of earth's geology. The author's goal is not to write a scathing attack of people who take the Genesis story literally and interpret geology with an assumption of the historicity of "Noah's flood", but he does clearly present evidence that the flood could not have been a literal global flood responsible for earth's geologic features. He presents his case respectfully but also strongly. A very good book to read about the issues of geology and religious influence in geological science.
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