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Ernest Belfort Bax (23 July 1854 26 November 1926) was a British socialist, journalist and philosopher. Born into a nonconformist religious family in Leamington, he was first introduced to Marxism while studying philosophy in Germany. He combined Karl Marx's ideas with those of Immanuel Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer and Eduard von Hartmann. Keen to explore possible metaphysical and ethical implications of socialism, he came to describe a "religion of socialism" as a means to overcome the dichotomy between the personal and the social, and also that between the cognitive and the emotional. He saw this as a replacement for organised religion, and was a fervent atheist, keen to free workers from what he saw as the moralism of the petty bourgeoisie. Almost throughout his life, he saw economic conditions as ripe for socialism, but felt this progress was delayed by a lack of education of the working class. Bax supported Karl Kautsky over Eduard Bernstein, but Kautsky had little time for what he saw as Bax's utopianism, and supported Theodore Rothstein's efforts to spread a more orthodox Marxism in the SDF. Initially very anti-nationalist, Bax came to support the British in World War I, but by this point he was concentrating on his career as a barrister and did little political work. Bax wrote a historical narrative about the Peasants War in Germany, the largest popular uprising in European history aside from the French Revolution). Despite its size, it has mostly been forgotten historically. Friedrich Engels wrote about it in 1850 from a Communist/Socialist perspective, and the Nazis often referenced it. Bax gives a narrative of the battles and individuals involved in the uprising. This edition of Baxs Peasant War is specially formatted with a Table of Contents and illustrations.

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