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The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, L.A. Confidential, White Jazz, American Tabloid... James Ellroy's high-velocity, best-selling novels have redefined noir for our age, propelling us within inches of the dark realities of America's recent history. Now, in The Cold Six Thousand, his most ambitious and explosive novel yet, he puts the whole of the 1960s under his blistering lens. The result is a work of fierce, epic fiction, a speedball through our most tumultuous time.
It begins in Dallas. November 22, 1963. The heart of the American Dream detonated.

Wayne Tedrow Jr., a young Vegas cop, arrives with a loathsome job to do. He's got $6,000 in cash and no idea that he is about to plunge into the cover-up conspiracy already brewing around Kennedy's assassination, no idea that this will mark the beginning of a hellish five-year ride through the private underbelly of public policy.

Ellroy's furiously paced narrative tracks Tedrow's ride: Dallas back to Vegas, with the Mob and Howard Hughes, south with the Klan and J. Edgar Hoover, shipping out to Vietnam and returning home, the bearer of white powder, plotting new deaths as 1968 approaches ...
Tedrow stands witness, as the icons of an iconic era mingle with cops, killers, hoods, and provocateurs. His story is ground zero in Ellroy's stunning vision: historical confluence as American Nightmare.

The Cold Six Thousand is a masterpiece.

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The Cold Six Thousand
Average rating
2 / 5
Long Haul
June 28th, 2013
Good book but a disappointment after the phenomenal American Tabloid. I would give this three stars if you haven't read that book. This book picks up minutes after the closure of American Tabloid. It is a much depressing read than its predecessor showing us the slow decline if Litell and Bondurant to the point by the end they are shadows of their former selves. Part of the problem I had was the introduction of Wayne Tedrow Jr. I never loved him as a character as much as Ward Litell, Pete Bondurant and the unforgettable Kemper Boyd. Tedrow is a emotionally unhinged and doesn't believe in anything making his motivation (other than hating his father) hard to follow. The other problem with this book is the writing style. I didn't like it and many others have commented on it as well, it is very abrupt and jerky most will not like it. Finally do not read this book if you have not read American tabloid it is not as good and without the backstory I think it would be confusing and not enjoyable.
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