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The Sioux Struggle

When the gold-struck Northwest was opened up to settlement, westward expansion progressed from a trickle to a flood, devastating everything—and everyone—in its path. The Sioux and the Cheyenne knew that the hordes of settlers had to be stopped. But nothing—not even their peace-making attempts—could quell the greedy desires of the white man for land.

Dependent upon buffalo for their livelihood, the Sioux found the great herds divided by the new railroad tracks and threatened on all sides by blue-uniformed soldiers. Soon, this proud people would find themselves drawn into a long, bloody battle against these soldiers, many hardened veterans of the Civil War.

Only Sitting Bull had the courage to fight back, defying the inevitable consequences. In the aftermath of the disastrous battle of the Little Big Horn, Sitting Bull was ready to lead his people in one last try at self-determination—and survival.

Impeccably researched, rich with real-life characters and period detail, this powerful historical novel vividly recounts the fall of the Sioux Nation and its inimitable leader, Sitting Bull, who heroically attempted to preserve his people's way of life in the face of overwhelming odds.

A Proud Stand

Sitting Bull took the lead. "I have killed many whites," he began, "but not without provocation. They have taken our land, they have killed our women and children, they have come where they were not welcome, telling those who have always lived there that they would have to leave. I am prepared to be peaceful, but not if it means giving up everything my people need to live."

De Smet listened respectfully, occasionally asking a question or two. "I am not here to make peace," he said. "I cannot do that, but it is something I want to see happen. I think it would be a good thing if you were to meet with the peace commissioners at Fort Rice. This war is a terrible thing. It is terrible for the whites and it is terrible for the Lakota. The cruelty is causing pain to everyone involved, and it would be a good thing if it could be ended now."

Sitting Bull said nothing.

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