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Public speeches are delivered on many different occasions, but no matter what the occasion, the speaker hopes to get the audience to accept his point of view.

Therefore, in a certain sense, all speeches are persuasive speeches: Persuading the audience to believe your information persuading the audience to change its beliefs persuading the audience not only to change its beliefs, but also to act on the changes.

The public speech therefore must begin with the establishment of the purpose of the speech. The speaker should begin preparing his speech by asking himself just what action he wishes his audience to take. The purpose gives direction to the speech and, to a degree, governs all subsequent efforts the speaker makes.

Next to this is the selection of the Central Idea, which is then divided into several sub-ideas which will, in turn, become the main headings of the body of your speech. Having one central idea, broken up into sub-ideas properly selected and supported, is a means of insuring unity in a speech.

After the body of the speech is complete, and only then, is it possible to determine an appropriate introduction and conclusion.

“All the world likes a good story.” That is basically a good metaphor for public speaking. Essentially, in speech making, you’re creating a story and in public speaking, you’re telling a story. Therefore, a good public speaker must be able to present an idea that will lead to a desired response.

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