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A provocative, unapologetic exposé on the Black voters and their relationship with the Democrat Party, as Black voters are characterized as paramours, at best, by the writer, who, himself, is Black. Through immensely entertaining anecdotes, many of which from his own past, the author takes the reader on a journey through Black attitudes and behaviors, with such chapter titles as, “Bend Over and Spread Yo’ Ballot Box,” “Living La Vida Negro,” and “Content of Color…Character of Skin.” These behaviors, observed by non-Blacks, may have bemused and silently enraged those who do not share such roots. And it is through these stories, along with the author’s own insights, that the reader is able to discern a “code” that has mandated that Blacks prostitute their rights of suffrage in exchange for nothing more than words and a prayer and remain wed to “the right of victimhood.”
Blacks, especially those who are default Democrats, will be challenged to read, understand, and appreciate what might the first wedge in their thinking, as the author defines a “preference for ignorance” to be the “abject idiocy” of what he calls America’s “minority centerfold.”
Finally, the small phalanx of free-thinking, conservative Black intellectuals who fearlessly speak their minds has a new member in this writer and his book. This proud and defiant South Georgia “farm boy,” which is how he refers to himself, came of age during the foment of the civil rights era and the waning days of Jim Crow, and the reader can actually smells the sweat of his strife, one that he says is long dead and provided no justification for today’s behavior among Blacks who cling to a dead past.
Black, Dumb and Barefoot. . .and Knocked Up by the Democrats bears intrepid testimony to his view that Ebonic political culture in league with liberal Democrat dogma has hampered the opportunity of Black people to break into the American success story. Armed with a barrage of metaphors, undisguised vitriol and surgical wry humor, the author posits that too many people of color have bought into the weary myth that voting in lockstep as Democrat party automatons will help them buy into the American dream. Such thinking has never been so boldly defied than it has been by this book.

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