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When Amelia Earhart took off for her around-the-world flight in 1937, no one would have suspected that within weeks, she would vanish into thin air. More than 70 years later, her vanishing act is still hotly debated by researchers, investigators and history buffs. Celebrated in books and movies and admired for her achievements, Amelia Earhart is equally well known as the 20th century's most famous "missing persons" case.

Among all of the uncertainties surrounding her fate, one thing is certain the public would never have this level of fascination with Amelia Earhart were she not such a captivating, fascinating personality. Her talent, charisma and courage were matched by her joie de vivre, as well as her adventurous outlook. Earhart maintained that women had just as much right to adventure and achievement as men.

By her own admission, Amelia loved the limelight, but her publicity served a far more noble purpose than self aggrandizement; it carved out a path of opportunity for the women who came before and after her. She was well aware of this, and felt the responsibility that came with being a trailblazer.


Pauline T. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!


Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. As the daughter of a prominent railroad attorney, Amelia spent her early years living in Midwestern railway towns such as including Kansas City and Des Moines. Growing up with her younger sister Muriel, Amelia was the tomboy of the family, climbing trees, belly slamming her sled down treacherous hills and even hunting rats with a .22 rifle. Another hobby for the young Amelia was collecting newspaper clippings about women who had succeeded in male dominated fields such as mechanical engineering, law and industry; these women became her early heroes.

Amelia's life of adventure began during World War I when she decided to leave school and help the war effort by tending wounded soldiers. After taking a Red Cross course, Amelia spent a year in Canada as a nurses' aid in a military hospital. This experience led her to enroll in the pre med program at New York's Columbia University. Her medical education ended when her parents asked her to join them in California.

Shortly after moving to California, Amelia revived an old interest her fascination with flight. During the First World War, she found herself captivated when a stunt pilot at an air show "buzzed" her and a friend, swooping low and then just missing them. As she said later, "I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by."

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