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"Makes a reader feel like a time traveler plopped down among men who were by turns vicious and visionary."—The Christian Science Monitor

The modern American economy was the creation of four men: Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan. They were the giants of the Gilded Age, a moment of riotous growth that established America as the richest, most inventive, and most productive country on the planet.

Acclaimed author Charles R. Morris vividly brings the men and their times to life. The ruthlessly competitive Carnegie, the imperial Rockefeller, and the provocateur Gould were obsessed with progress, experiment, and speed. They were balanced by Morgan, the gentleman businessman, who fought, instead, for a global trust in American business. Through their antagonism and their verve, they built an industrial behemoth—and a country of middle-class consumers. The Tycoons tells the incredible story of how these four determined men wrenched the economy into the modern age, inventing a nation of full economic participation that could not have been imagined only a few decades earlier.

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    An Okay Overview

    Although this book would seem to focus on the titular tycoons, it does attempt to place them in the context of the times and the other events that were happening to make their rises possible. Unsurprisingly, the chapters about the tycoons are the more interesting chapters, but the other chapters do help. I think the other chapters also help dispell that these four men "invented the American Supereconomy" they had a lot of help from men who did not go on to amass tremendous wealth or fame. This book does a good job of giving a quick overview of the things these four did, and is a good start before jumping into biographies of the specific men.


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