More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items.

itemsitem
See your RECOMMENDATIONS
Helpful Hints

Synopsis

We were created on the outer edge of the universe, and powerful ancients continue to watch us from that home far away. The ancients use 100% of their brains, which enables them to perform fantastic feats no earthly creature could imagine. Many years ago, these ancient beings altered the human DNA, removing our capability to use 100% of our brains, therefore keeping us forever beneath their reign and keeping them forever safe from human attack. Despite the lessened use of our brains, the human race has developed high-tech radar devices that travel into space, searching for intelligent life. The ancients have become aware of this technology; they are now concerned that humans have advanced enough to bring war. In an effort to avoid the inevitable, the ancients are coming to Earth to destroy the human race. Extermination is eminent, until Earth connects with its “sister planet.” Together, the humans must fight back against this ancient power that seeks to destroy. The Outer Edge is not merely science fiction; it is an authoritative vision of our living universe. These fictional tribulations have direct and irrefutable links to science. And so the question remains: is science fiction truly fiction at all, or does it peer into the depths of fact and foreshadow devastation yet to come? Decipher the true riddles of the universe with The Outer Edge.These riddles include the science based posits on how the afterlife and prayer are indeed true. We also answer how the psychics, mediums and all the paranormal work through science. ForeWord Clarion Review FICTION The Outer Edge: Our Origins From Dust to Us William N. Ellis III (The Messenger) Trafford Publishing 978-1-4269-4204-4 Three Stars (out of Five) “Where do we come from?” is perhaps the most popular existential question. Over the years, there have been numerous possible answers: the Big Bang, divine creation over seven days, adaption from single-celled organisms. Ultimately, the answer to the question is not necessarily about where we came from, but why we are here. William N. Ellis III’s latest book, The Outer Edge, explores a theory that seeks to answer both. Jampa and Pammy are siblings from the Outer Edge, the perimeter of the universe. As young members of the Ancient Good, they protect the unified grid from beings like Riverway, a member of the Ancient Evil. The outcome of the battle leads Ancient Good to journey to a blue planet called Earth. There, the story switches to Gene, a common salesman, living with his wife and family in Ohio. After a near accident in his home, Gene discovers he has an extraordinary gift and opportunity. Under the guidance of Pammy and eventually Jampa, Gene must defend Ancient Good against Ancient Evil in a great debate. The Outer Edge is a modern quantum mysticism parable, similar to works like What the BLEEP do we know?! It champions knowledge, compassion, and love as a way to work with and shape the universe. Ellis claims to have used automatic writing, in addition to having received ideas for the story as messages from the spirit realm (that’s why he’s the messenger, not the author). The result is clear, precise writing, particularly when it comes to crafting tense, powerful scenes. After Jampa makes a speech, Ellis writes, “The entire hall erupted in a frenzy of applause. From left to right to top to bottom, warriors slammed their palms together and parted their lips to cheer and whistle. Briefly, a tear trickled in Jampa’s eye, for the idea of living beings committed to lives of goodness never failed to move him.” Ellis commits a portion of the book to building up for a war, but after a skirmish between two characters the author goes straight to negotiating the treaty. The story does have very strong central characters. For instance, Riverway, his antagonist, is chilling and diabolical, yet strangely sympathetic after you learn why he is like he is. Although Ellis might rush his characters through plot points, he gives them clever, descriptive dialogue. In one scene, Pammy advises Gene, saying, “Battling against evil is like trying to floss using barbed wire.” The Outer Edge is fascinating. It’s the perfect work for introducing others to the concepts in quantum mysticism. Even if readers only comprehend The Outer Edge on a surface level, it’s an interesting tale of good versus evil with a sci-fi bent. While it might be slightly confusing to those unfamiliar with the ideas, it’s a thought-provoking answer to anyone who wonders how humankind got here. Katerie Prior

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS