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From bestselling Scandinavian crime writer Åke Edwardson—whose books are international sensations in Europe—comes this gripping novel of suspense and character involving two missing persons, two detectives, and a mystery dating to World War II.

A brother and sister believe that their father has gone missing. They think he may have traveled in search of his father, who was presumed lost decades ago in World War II. Meanwhile, there are reports that a woman is being abused, but she can’t be found and her family won’t tell the police where she is. Two missing people and two very different families combine in this dynamic and suspenseful mystery by the Swedish master Åke Edwardson.

Gothenburg’s Chief Inspector Erik Winter travels to Scotland in search of the missing man, aided there by an old friend from Scotland Yard. Back in Gothenburg, Afro-Swedish detective Aneta Djanali discovers how badly someone doesn’t want her to find the missing woman when she herself is threatened. Sail of Stone is a brilliantly perceptive character study, acutely observed and skillfully written with an unerring sense of pace.

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    Disconnections in Sail of Stone

    An atempt to interweave two plotlines which fails throug porly developed charaters and an oveuse of internal monologue. An excess of flowery descrption drags on movement through the overwhelmingly slow action of the plot.


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