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Synopsis

Winner of the Pulitzer prize in 1974 and the culmination of a life's work, The Denial of Death is Ernest Becker's brilliant and impassioned answer to the "why" of human existence. In bold contrast to the predominant Freudian school of thought, Becker tackles the problem of the vital lie -- man's refusal to acknowledge his own mortality. In doing so, he sheds new light on the nature of humanity and issues a call to life and its living that still resonates more than twenty years after its writing.

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The Denial of Death
Average rating
5 / 5
Room temp IQ? Try Dr. Seuss instead.
September 11th, 2013
This is philosophy of a high order. Becker quotes and elaborates on ideas set forth by many of the greatest philosophical minds in our history. While much of the content herein is offered as supplemental to the ideas that Becker quotes, he also manages to establish his own set of ideas (in reference to the topic of the book being about the fear of death and how it is the central point to any and all human behavior). I absolutely love the comparison between the creative genius and the paranoid schizophrenic and how there is a fine line (if any) between the two. Easily the best book I've ever read to date. I recommend it to anyone with an interest/fascination/obsession with death.
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