More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

itemsitem

Synopsis

He was named after an enemy of the United States.  

He was proslavery despite his loyalty to the Union.  He burned and pillaged an already beaten foe on a march history will never forget.

If, as he famously said, "war is hell," William Tecumsah Sherman can be classified as a flamethrower of ruthless ferocity.  Defined by his contradictions, Sherman achieved immortality in his role as Ulysses Grant's hammer in the Civil War.  A failed banker and lawyer, Sherman found his calling with the outbreak of war in 1861.  With indecision a common ailment among Union generals early the conflict, Sherman's temperment and unwavering focus on the mission at hand-preserving the Union-helped shift the fortunes of North and South.

Authors Agostino Von Hassell and Ed Breslin present Sherman as once man and phenomenon.  From Bull Run to Shiloh, from Vicksburg to Chattanooga, and from Atlanta to Savannah, Sherman carved the Confederacy with a feral singularity of purpose.  At times disheveled and informal to a fault, "Uncle Billy" became a hero whose legend only grew with allegations of villainy.

People who read this also enjoyed

Get a 1 year subscription
for / issue

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS