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Synopsis

In this book, Philadelphia Ice Creams, comprising the first group, are very palatable, but expensive. In many parts of the country it is quite difficult to get good cream. For that reason, I have given a group of creams, using part milk and part cream, but it must be remembered that it takes smart "juggling" to make ice cream from milk. By far better use condensed milk, with enough water or milk to rinse out the cans.

Ordinary fruit creams may be made with condensed milk at a cost of about fifteen cents a quart, which, of course, is cheaper than ordinary milk and cream.

In places where neither cream nor condensed milk can be purchased, a fair ice cream is made by adding two tablespoonfuls of olive oil to each quart of milk. The cream for Philadelphia Ice Cream should be rather rich, but not double cream.

If pure raw cream is stirred rapidly, it swells and becomes frothy, like the beaten whites of eggs, and is "whipped cream." To prevent this in making Philadelphia Ice Cream, one-half the cream is scalded, and when it is very cold, the remaining half of raw cream is added. This gives the smooth, light and rich consistency which makes these creams so different from others.

CONTENTS
FOREWORD
PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAMS
NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAMS
ICE CREAMS FROM CONDENSED MILK
FROZEN PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS
WATER ICES AND SHERBETS OR SORBETS
FROZEN FRUITS
FRAPPÉ
PARFAIT
MOUSSE
SAUCES FOR ICE CREAMS
REFRESHMENTS FOR AFFAIRS

Soups
Sweetbreads
Shell Fish Dishes
Poultry and Game Dishes
Cold Dishes
Salads
Sandwiches
SUGGESTIONS FOR CHURCH SUPPERS

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