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Synopsis

I know the importance of the individual experience of metastacised melanoma cancer, because it is a very special journey. People are prone to forget, such as when one forgets they have a finger, until they hit it; people also forget they have a life until it is very seriously threatened. The worst sentence in this world that a doctor can pronounce is, “I am sorry, but the medical profession can do nothing further for you.”

 

This work explores how my wife, Jeannie, who was my home caregiver, and I travelled the cancer journey together. The journey was not the same for Jeannie as it was for me—it was my melanoma cancer, but I was Jeannie’s husband, and therefore the stress was that much more for her, as she never knew what further stresses she had to face.

 

This book examines the strengths of our relationship, despite the difficulties of living on an island. It is interesting how we were aware of these difficulties, and yet we worked through them. Then came the details of how the cancer was treated, both by conventional and alternative treatment. My alternative treatment had a journey all of its own, incorporating several people, all of whom were heroes in their own right. This alternative treatment was later to be regarded as a miracle by several oncologists in a Brisbane hospital.

 

It is a thoughtful, painful, and revealing account of the years spent fighting this cancer. This book is educative, giving a report on melanoma. Mainly, the message it brings is one of hope for those who now have seemingly no hope against melanoma.

 

I had three CT scans and a bone scan in May 2012, proving I am still free of melanoma.

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