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Synopsis

Alberich had spent most of his youth in the Karsite military schools training to be an officer. As the son of an impoverished mother, he had no other career choice open to him. And Alberich had risen in the ranks with almost unnatural speed. He developed expertise with many weapons and excelled in academic subjects with an ease that was the envy of his classmates. But in fact, the reclusive Alberich studied long and hard, pushing himself ruthlessly.
 
In battle, Alberich had always had a sort of “sixth sense” about things which were about to happen—when and from where the enemy would attack. Instinctively, he his this ability, for the Sunpriests kept careful watch for anyone exhibiting “demon powers” which were the hallmark of Karse’s greatest enemy—the witch-nation of Valdemar. Those they caught were “cleansed” in the fires of Vkandis Sunlord.
 
Both Alberich’s skill and secret served him well in the army of Karse, and when Alberich became one of Karse’s youngest captains, he received a special gift—a powerful white stallion “liberated” from the enemy. But this honor was merely a distraction, for the Sunpriests had laid a trap which even Alberich’s strange foresight could not predict…
 
Saved from burning as a witch when this odd white stallion braved flames and carried him over the border into Valdemar, he was healed by the same enemies he had been taught to hate his entire life. Though he knew he could never again return to his home, Alberich also knew he could never truly become a Valdemaran. How could Alberich remain true to his own people and still retain his honor while helping to train the direst enemy of Karse?

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Exile's Honor
Average rating
4.7 / 5
Humanity triumphs
March 7th, 2013
I expected a book full of war and trials... But it was a story full of overwhelming humanity and triumph; not in the 'victorious' sense, but in the sense of making the strange seem familiar, with characters who touched the reader and made them more real than fictitious. I have no complaints of 'predictability' in this one. It was not an excessively sad tale, nor a false-seemingly joyous one. It literally filled in the gaps, and made Alberich so tangible that it makes me want to go back and reread some of the earlier novels that he played such a huge part in. (Perhaps this was an underlying motive as well, since it comes so near the end of the series in publication order, and yet immediately precedes the first trilogy. If so - good play!) Looking forward to the follow-up :)
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