More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

itemsitem

Synopsis

Young Huck Finn has no mother and his father is a brutal drunkard. To escape his fathers cruel tyranny he fakes his own death and runs away. As a homeless waif he travels along the Mississippi Valley by foot and by raft encountering a variety of unsavory and humorous characters who involve him in their dubious misadventures. This story, rich in character, humor, and the adventurous frontier experience of the Mississippi, vividly recreates the world, the people, and the language that Mark Twain knew and loved from his own years on the riverboats. The text is unabridged and includes 148 illustrations from the original 1884 edition. Huckleberry "Huck" Finn is a fictional character created by Mark Twain, who first appeared in the book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and is the protagonist and narrator of its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He is 12 or 13 years old during the former and a year older ("thirteen or fourteen or along there," Chapter 17) at the time of the latter. Huck also narrates Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective, two shorter sequels to the first two books. Huck is the son of the town's vagrant drunkard, "Pap" Finn. Sleeping on door-steps when the weather is fair, in empty hogsheads during storms, and living off of what he receives from others, Huck lives the life of a destitute vagabond. The author metaphorically names him "the juvenile pariah of the village." The author describes Huck as "idle, and lawless, and vulgar, and bad," qualities for which he was admired by all the children in the village, although their mothers "cordially hated and dreaded" him.

People who read this also enjoyed

Get a 1 year subscription
for / issue

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS