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Synopsis

Professionally converted for accurate flowing-text e-book format reproduction, Meteorology for Army Aviators (FM 1-230) provides Army aviation personnel with the general principles of modern meteorology required to assist them in planning and conducting day-to-day flight operations. It will also be useful as a supplemental text and a ready reference. It covers theoretical aspects of meteorological phenomena, the weather facilities available at airfields, severe weather warnings, types of forecasts, and information which will enable Army aviation personnel to interpret and evaluate weather conditions. Although the general information contained in this manual is required background information for weather forecasters, the manual does not include operational forecasting techniques.

Army aviators must be knowledgeable of existing and forecasted weather conditions prior to commencing a flight. The aviator must have a thorough knowledge of the meteorological conditions and factors which produce the weather. Although current navigational systems and flight techniques make flight into instrument meteorological conditions possible, flight into hazardous weather conditions, such as icing conditions that could exist in cloudless air, should be avoided whenever possible.

Weather in the combat zone is a major factor in the decisions of the commander; and it can significantly influence the outcome of the battle. Army aviation units, as an essential part of the combined arms team, must be able to operate successfully in different weather and terrain environments. The high threat posed by the enemy on the battlefield makes it necessary to conduct combat missions in the terrain flight mode to avoid detection by electronic means and destruction by highly sophisticated air defense weapons. Under these conditions, adverse weather can impair mission success and endanger aviation personnel and equipment.

PART ONE. WEATHER PRINCIPLES AND THEORY * Chapter 1. INTRODUCTION * Chapter 2. THE ATMOSPHERE * Chapter 3. TEMPERATURE * Chapter 4. MOISTURE * Chapter 5. ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE * Chapter 6. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION * Section I. General Circulation * II. Secondary Circulation * Chapter 7. STABILITY AND INSTABILITY * Chapter 8. CLOUDS * Section I. General * II. Types of Clouds * Chapter 9. AIR MASSES * Section I. General * II. Air Masses Affecting the United States * Chapter 10. FRONTAL WEATHER * PART TWO. WEATHER HAZARDS * Chapter 11. TURBULENCE * Chapter 12. THUNDERSTORMS * Chapter 13. AIRBORNE WEATHER RADAR * Chapter 14. ICING * Chapter 15. FOG * PART THREE. POLAR, SUBPOLAR, AND TROPICAL WEATHER * Chapter 16. POLAR AND SUBPOLAR WEATHER * Chapter 17. TROPICAL WEATHER * PART FOUR. WEATHER FLIGHT PLANNING * Chapter 18. PREFLIGHT PLANNING * Chapter 19. IN-FLIGHT PLANNING * APPENDIX A * REFERENCES * APPENDIX B * TELETYPE INFORMATION * APPENDIX C * USE OF DD FORM 175-1 (FLIGHT WEATHER BRIEFING) * GLOSSARY

As a bonus, this reproduction includes the complete 2012 Army Leadership manual (FM 6-22), which describes the Army's view of leadership, outlines the levels of leadership (direct, organizational, and strategic), and describes the attributes and core leader competencies across all levels.

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