A Rakuten Company

More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

itemsitem

Synopsis

Now a new original series on AMC
 
Basing his tale on remarkable original research, historian Alexander Rose reveals the unforgettable story of the spy ring that helped America win the Revolutionary War. For the first time, Rose takes us beyond the battlefront and into the shadowy underworld of double agents and triple crosses, covert operations and code breaking, and unmasks the courageous, flawed individuals who inhabited this wilderness of mirrors—including the spymaster at the heart of it all, George Washington.
 
Previously published as Washington’s Spies
 
“Alexander Rose tells this important story with style and wit.”—Pulitzer Prize–winning author Joseph J. Ellis
 
“Fascinating . . . Spies proved to be the tipping point in the summer of 1778, helping Washington begin breaking the stalemate with the British. . . . [Alexander] Rose’s book brings to light their crucial help in winning American independence.”Chicago Tribune
 
“[Rose] captures the human dimension of spying, war and leadership . . . from the naive twenty-one-year-old Nathan Hale, who was captured and executed, to the quietly cunning Benjamin Tallmadge, who organized the ring in 1778, to the traitorous Benedict Arnold.”The Wall Street Journal
 
“Rose gives us intrigue, crossed signals, derring-do, and a priceless slice of eighteenth-century life. Think of Alan Furst with muskets.”—Richard Brookhiser, author of Founding Father
 
“A compelling portrait of [a] rogues’ gallery of barkeeps, misfits, hypochondriacs, part-time smugglers, and full-time neurotics that will remind every reader of the cast of a John le Carré novel.”—Arthur Herman, National Review


From the Trade Paperback edition.

People who read this also enjoyed

Get a 1 year subscription
for / issue

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Washington's Spies
Average rating
2 / 5
Meh
May 21st, 2014
I bought this book because of the AMC Turn series. I'm guessing because of the success they have had, the series will be better than the book. The book was a little too heavy on direct quotes. Chp4 on the origins of sending secret messages with invisble ink was out of place and took away from the suspense (I know it was nonfiction). Another small gripe for me was that it jumped around in chronology from year to year and decade to decade from the 1730s & 40s to the 1820s & beyond. The good stuff happened around the 1770 to 1780s. Not bad, but I'm waiting for the series.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

1 review

Read This On

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS