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Synopsis

Like thousands of Aboriginal children in the United States, Canada, and elsewhere in the colonized world, Xatsu'll chief Bev Sellars spent part of her childhood as a student in a church-run residential school.

These institutions endeavored to "civilize" Native children through Christian teachings; forced separation from family, language, and culture; and strict discipline. Perhaps the most symbolically potent strategy used to alienate residential school children was addressing them by assigned numbers only-not by the names with which they knew and understood themselves.

In this frank and poignant memoir of her years at St. Joseph's Mission, Sellars breaks her silence about the residential school's lasting effects on her and her family-from substance abuse to suicide attempts-and eloquently articulates her own path to healing. Number One comes at a time of recognition-by governments and society at large-that only through knowing the truth about these past injustices can we begin to redress them.

Bev Sellars is chief of the Xatsu'll (Soda Creek) First Nation in Williams Lake, British Columbia. She holds a degree in history from the University of Victoria and a law degree from the University of British Columbia. She has served as an advisor to the British Columbia Treaty Commission.


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They Called Me Number One
Average rating
4 / 5
They called Me Number One
August 19th, 2014
Beautifully written. Let's me understand my Mom & family better. Sad that some are stuck in their addictions, trying to self-medicate their lives & living with the horrible memories of that place & the terror of being children - 2nd or 3rd generation products of a fractured people. I am glad I am working on myself...slowly changing the programming.
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2 reviews
They called Me Number One
August 19th, 2014
Beautifully written. Let's me understand my Mom & family better. Sad that some are stuck in their addictions, trying to self-medicate their lives & living with the horrible memories of that place & the terror of being children - 2nd or 3rd generation products of a fractured people. I am glad I am working on myself...slowly changing the programming.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

2 reviews
They Called Me Number One
May 19th, 2014
Most of the information in this memoir was second hand and not very revealing. I did not get much insight into the residential schools from this work.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

1 review

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