More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

itemsitem

Synopsis

The winner surveyed the battlefield of the Alamo, and the battle he had just won. Mexican commander Antonio López de Santa Anna commented to an aide that “Much blood has been shed, but the battle is over; it was but a small affair.” Santa Anna was right, if one makes the mistake of looking just at the battle. It was a small affair.

The Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto were part of a chain of events stretching back to the settlement of North and Central America. They start another chain, still with us today. The Texas-Mexican War of 1836 led to Texas becoming part of the United States in 1845. A year later the United States and Mexico were at war. Fifteen years later, inexorably, Fort Sumter was fired on and the United States was at war with itself.

This is the story of the first links in this chain, from before the Alamo was besieged in 1836 (for the third time in its history) through the aftermath of Texan success at San Jacinto. The reader is there, with Travis, Bowie, Crockett, Houston and Santa Anna.

The 150th anniversary of the American Civil War is a good time to examine a major incident on the road to that war. It is also a good time to examine a major influence on the modern history of the United States and the modern history of Mexico. This is a good time to remember the Alamo, to remember Goliad and to remember San Jacinto.

People who read this also enjoyed

Get a 1 year subscription
for / issue

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • BLACKBERRY
  • WINDOWS