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Synopsis

Celeste Price is an eighth-grade English teacher in suburban Tampa. She's undeniably attractive. She drives a red Corvette with tinted windows. Her husband, Ford, is rich, square-jawed, and devoted to her.

But Celeste's devotion lies elsewhere. She has a singular sexual obsession—fourteen-year-old boys. Celeste pursues her craving with sociopathic meticulousness and forethought; her sole purpose in becoming a teacher is to fulfill her passion and provide her access to her compulsion. As the novel opens, fall semester at Jefferson Jr. High is beginning.

In mere weeks, Celeste has chosen and lured the lusciously naive Jack Patrick into her web. Jack is enthralled and in awe of his teacher, and, most important, willing to accept Celeste's terms for a secret relationship—car rides after school; rendezvous at Jack's house while his single father works late; body-slamming encounters in Celeste's empty classroom between periods.

Ever mindful of the danger—the perpetual risk of exposure, Jack's father's own attraction to her, and the ticking clock as Jack leaves innocent boyhood behind—the hyperbolically insatiable Celeste bypasses each hurdle with swift thinking and shameless determination, even when the solutions involve greater misdeeds than the affair itself. In slaking her sexual thirst, Celeste Price is remorseless and deviously free of hesitation, a monstress driven by pure motivation. She deceives everyone, and cares nothing for anyone or anything but her own pleasure.

With crackling, rampantly unadulterated prose, Tampa is a grand, uncompromising, seriocomic examination of want and a scorching literary debut.

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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Tampa
Average rating
4 / 5
January 23rd, 2014
Disturbing, clever, and I think a really important book for its unapologetic portrayal of female desire. I was gripped from the first page.
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1 review
Pretty good
January 12th, 2014
This book was written well. It kept me I'm suspense through your the whole novel! It could have had a better ending though.
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1 review
October 6th, 2013
I had initially heard about this book from a small feature in Entertainment Weekly magazine and was intrigued with the premise. I had been cautioned by several people that it contained quite graphic and explicit content, but that it would certainly be a conversation starter. Yes, this book is extremely graphic in its descriptions. Celeste is a highly sexual person and she’s quite blatant with what she does or wants done to her. That being said, if you set that part aside, the story itself is quite a compelling one. It’s a touchy subject that has become more prominent in the news; a teacher seducing a younger student. There have been other books that touch upon this idea, such as The Reader by Bernhard Schlink – which has also been turned into a movie starring Kate Winslet. It’s truly an interesting and decent story that gets overshadowed by the shock value of the crass language and explicit content. By far this book will be talked about for how sexual it is and for some it may be hard to look past that and see the actual story that’s there. Yes, there’s a lot of graphic content and at times it may feel gratuitous, like Nutting’s writing that in to shock the masses but you can also attest to that as how Celeste thinks. She’s that perverse that that’s what goes through her mind 24/7 as she narrates the book. Tampa reads like a train wreck that you can’t stop looking at. Celeste is a mess and Nutting does a fine job at writing such a unlikable protagonist. There were moments where you try to feel some sympathy for her but she’s very blatant in her intentions and lack of remorse and so that inkling of sympathy is quickly squashed. It’s not going to be a book for everyone, and it will definitely make some feel uncomfortable but if you’re able to look past that, it’s a good read.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

2 reviews
October 6th, 2013
I had initially heard about this book from a small feature in Entertainment Weekly magazine and was intrigued with the premise. I had been cautioned by several people that it contained quite graphic and explicit content, but that it would certainly be a conversation starter. Yes, this book is extremely graphic in its descriptions. Celeste is a highly sexual person and she’s quite blatant with what she does or wants done to her. That being said, if you set that part aside, the story itself is quite a compelling one. It’s a touchy subject that has become more prominent in the news; a teacher seducing a younger student. There have been other books that touch upon this idea, such as The Reader by Bernhard Schlink – which has also been turned into a movie starring Kate Winslet. It’s truly an interesting and decent story that gets overshadowed by the shock value of the crass language and explicit content. By far this book will be talked about for how sexual it is and for some it may be hard to look past that and see the actual story that’s there. Yes, there’s a lot of graphic content and at times it may feel gratuitous, like Nutting’s writing that in to shock the masses but you can also attest to that as how Celeste thinks. She’s that perverse that that’s what goes through her mind 24/7 as she narrates the book. Tampa reads like a train wreck that you can’t stop looking at. Celeste is a mess and Nutting does a fine job at writing such a unlikable protagonist. There were moments where you try to feel some sympathy for her but she’s very blatant in her intentions and lack of remorse and so that inkling of sympathy is quickly squashed. It’s not going to be a book for everyone, and it will definitely make some feel uncomfortable but if you’re able to look past that, it’s a good read.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

2 reviews

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