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Synopsis

As fewer and fewer GenXers and Millennials fill the pews of mainline churches, those who seek to speak to them are faced with three possibilities: write off these generations as lost and unreachable, which the church has done with great success over the last two decades; attempt to become more "relevant" with "fill-in-the-blank" sermons, which has proven to have little lasting success; or to exegete the culture of these generations in order to discover the points of intersection between their stories and the story of Jesus. Mark Feldmeir shows preachers how to do just that.

Feldmeir, himself a GenXer, argues for four hermeneutical themes which preachers would do well to explore with clarity and intention as they seek to speak to the emerging generations of GenXers and Millennials (those born in 1964 or later). These themes are ambiguity, suffering, reconciliation, and transformation. Feldmeir explores each theme both culturally and biblically, offering glimpses of how these themes are expressed through music, art, film, literature, and pop culture, and in the life of Jesus. He follows each thematic development with several model sermons to support and strengthen his argument.

“Here’s a preacher who’s got a thing for reaching a new generation of young adults for Christ and he knows how to do it. Weaving biblical insights with scenes from movies and other artifacts of contemporary American culture, Feldmeir makes the Good News of the gospel good news for a new generation in the emerging church.”

—William H. Willimon, Duke University

"Because Mark Feldmeir takes both the Gospel and the experiences of his generation with deep seriousness, he has written a traveling companion for restless and inquisitive young adults who think Christianity no longer speaks to them. Feldmeir is creative, conversational, and dedicated to bringing scripture and everyday culture to a fruitful cross-pollination."

-Tom Beaudoin, Boston College, author of Virtual Faith

I can't begin to do justice to this bountiful book so full of brio, gusto, bravo and grace. These sermons will touch your emotions as much as they deepen your understanding.

-Leonard Sweet, Drew Theological School

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