More titles to consider

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items.

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.


The summer after her freshman year at all-Mormon Brigham Young University, Marguerite Farnsworth falls in love with philosophy by way of falling in love with an atheist philosophy student. Her search for Truth (with a capital T), God, the meaning of life, and a boyfriend leads her away from religious belief, but along the way she learns there are things even atheists can have faith in.

"Blasphemous!" - Hemant Mehta, author of I Sold My Soul on eBay: Viewing Faith Through an Atheist's Eyes

"[A] realistic and heartfelt portrait of the ups and downs of life and love for young people who don't fit the perfect Mormon mold." - Main Street Plaza

"I found this book with its portrayal of the stark realities of relationships and the challenges of existence a clear-eyed examination of some of life’s most difficult questions. What I loved most about the book was that it did not shy away from going more deeply into philosophy than about any book I can remember since The Elegance of the Hedgehog. It follows a path that ranges from Kierkegaard to the Marquis de Sade … it’s clear that the author understands the existential difficulties of a faith journey." — Steven L. Peck, author of The Scholar of Moab

"[A Lost Argument] defies exclusive categorization … I think anyone who has progressed from a ‘simple’ view of faith to an increasingly complex and nuanced view of faith through critical study of philosophy, theology, and the scriptures would find something to appreciate in A Lost Argument … Mormon or not, theist or not, anyone who advocates for the liberal arts and its capacity to develop and sharpen a person’s thinking should read this novel." — Irresistible (Dis)Grace

"Marguerite transforms and matures (fitfully and awkwardly, at times) through a dialogue not only with the other living characters, but with the conflicting parts of herself, and with writers and philosophers dead and gone whose ideas still live on." — Wheat and Tares

"This is a great book for discussion. Philosophy and faith are difficult topics to write about and sometimes harder to read. Therese [Doucet] did a wonderful job." — Goodreads

Ratings and Reviews

Overall rating

No ratings yet
5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Stars
0 0 0 0 0

Be the first to rate and review this book!

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!


You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • IOS