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Synopsis

Nature is out of balance in the human world. The sun hasn't shone in years, and crops are failing. Worse yet, strange and hostile creatures have begun to appear. The people's survival hangs in the balance.

To solve the crisis, the oracle stones are cast, and Kaede and Taisin, two seventeen-year-old girls, are picked to go on a dangerous and unheard-of journey to Tanlili, the city of the Fairy Queen. Taisin is a sage, thrumming with magic, and Kaede is of the earth, without a speck of the otherworldly. And yet the two girls' destinies are drawn together during the mission. As members of their party succumb to unearthly attacks and fairy tricks, the two come to rely on each other and even begin to fall in love. But the Kingdom needs only one huntress to save it, and what it takes could tear Kaede and Taisin apart forever.

The exciting adventure prequel to Malinda Lo's highly acclaimed novel Ash is overflowing with lush Chinese influences and details inspired by the I Ching, and is filled with action and romance.

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CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Huntress
Average rating
2.3 / 5
February 22nd, 2014
I think my feelings are kind of pulled in many different ways for Huntress. And not necessarily because the characters were worth feeling for. I apologize that this review is going to start so negative. I was just so disappointed. From the start I was kind of feeling the book. Lo introduces you to Kaede (one of two main characters, but obviously the main main character), and I thought she'd be a really interesting character. And then you meet Taisin, who doesn't seem as interesting, but I was waiting to see what Lo did with that. And then she did nothing. And nothing. And kind of more nothing. I know that might seem unfair, as she does give you more information on them as you read on, and so you technically do get to know about them better, but you don't get to have more of a feeling of them. Very rarely in this entire novel did I really care if the characters met their goal or if they ended up with their love interests. There was a good reason for this - their love stories never seemed believable. Even "love at first sight" types of stories are more believable. This disappointed me because I love seeing positive gay relationships in fantasy novels. And the relationship was positive. It was just boring. Often the characters just kind of had their feelings blossom before their eyes, but the passion of this kind of love was never communicated. I was just supposed to believe it because it was what Lo told me, not because of what the characters communicated to me. The writing style was not one of my favorites. I don't like when perspective shifts between paragraphs. I think it is a lazy way to tell a story, and makes it harder to know who is giving you information. Now to some positives: I love that the character's queerness was not a concern of any of the characters in the story. I love that it was not viewed as abnormal. It was a very positive representation of queerness. I loved that Kaede and Taisin were strong not because of their physical strength, but because they were able to make decisions for themselves (even if I did not care about their decisions). Some of the scenes did make me care what was going to happen, and I did rush through a few chapters to see what would happen next. I wish this whole book had been written more like that.
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2 reviews
Malinda Lo's Huntress
November 6th, 2013
I think my feelings are kind of pulled in many different ways for Huntress. And not necessarily because the characters were worth feeling for. I apologize that this review is going to start so negative. I was just so disappointed. From the start I was kind of feeling the book. Lo introduces you to Kaede (one of two main characters, but obviously the main main character), and I thought she'd be a really interesting character. And then you meet Taisin, who doesn't seem as interesting, but I was waiting to see what Lo did with that. And then she did nothing. And nothing. And kind of more nothing. I know that might seem unfair, as she does give you more information on them as you read on, and so you technically do get to know about them better, but you don't get to have more of a feeling of them. Very rarely in this entire novel did I really care if the characters met their goal or if they ended up with their love interests. There was a good reason for this - their love stories never seemed believable. Even "love at first sight" types of stories are more believable. This disappointed me because I love seeing positive gay relationships in fantasy novels. And the relationship was positive. It was just boring. Often the characters just kind of had their feelings blossom before their eyes, but the passion of this kind of love was never communicated. I was just supposed to believe it because it was what Lo told me, not because of what the characters communicated to me. The writing style was not one of my favorites. I don't like when perspective shifts between paragraphs. I think it is a lazy way to tell a story, and makes it harder to know who is giving you information. Now to some positives: I love that the character's queerness was not a concern of any of the characters in the story. I love that it was not viewed as abnormal. It was a very positive representation of queerness. I loved that Kaede and Taisin were strong not because of their physical strength, but because they were able to make decisions for themselves (even if I did not care about their decisions). Some of the scenes did make me care what was going to happen, and I did rush through a few chapters to see what would happen next. I wish this whole book had been written more like that.
Helpful? Yes | No | Report

2 reviews

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