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The acclaimed writer, respected thinker and outspoken former bishop Richard Holloway recounts a life defined by the biggest questions: Who am I? And what is God? At fourteen, Richard Holloway left his home in the Vale of Leven, north of Glasgow, and travelled hundreds of miles to be educated and trained for the priesthood by a religious order in an English monastery. By twenty-five he had been ordained and was working in the slums of Glasgow. Throughout the following forty years, Richard touched the lives of many people in the Church and in the wider community. But behind his confident public face lay a restless, unquiet heart and a constantly searching mind. Why is the Church, which claims to be the instrument of God's love, so prone to cruelty and condemnation? And how can a man live with the tension between public faith and private doubt? In his long-awaited memoir, Richard seeks to answer these questions and to explain how, after many crises of faith, he finally and painfully left the Church. It is a wise, poetic and fiercely honest book.

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    I chose to read this book because I had enjoyed and respected radio broadcasts by its author as Bishop of Edinburgh but until I read a Review following its publication did not know he had left the Church. It was an easy book to "get into". The relaxed, sincerity of the prose and almost photographic descriptions of childhood and school days drew me in at once. His progression in the Church, family and Parish life with a ceaselessly enquiring mind and honest admission of doubt to held me the end. This is a book by and about a good man, an honest man, and a man not afraid to reveal his innermost thoughts and feelings. I intend to read more of his works for those reasons and for his melodic prose.


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