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Flextime (or flexitime, flexi-time, originally derived from the German word Gleitzeit which literally means 'sliding time') is a variable work schedule, in contrast to traditional[citation needed] work arrangements requiring employees to work a standard 9am to 5pm day. Its invention is usually credited to William Henning. Under flextime, there is typically a core period (of approximately 50% of total working time/working day) of the day when employees are expected to be at work (for example, between 11 am and 3pm), while the rest of the working day is ""flexitime"", in which employees can choose when they work, subject to achieving total daily, weekly or monthly hours in the region of what the employer expects, and subject to the necessary work being done. A flextime policy allows staff to determine when they will work, while a flexplace policy allows staff to determine where they will work.

This book is your one-stop, ultimate resource for Introducing Flexible Working into Your Organization. Here you will find the most up-to-date information, analysis, background and everything you need to know.

In easy to read chapters, with extensive references and links covering all aspects of Introducing Flexible Working into Your Organization: Flextime, List of topics on working time and conditions, 35-hour workweek, Absenteeism, Bank Holidays Act 1871, Beer o'clock, Blue law, Bradford Factor, Break (work), Business day, Business hours, Convention concerning Hours of Work on Board Ship and Manning, Conventions concerning Employment of Women during the Night, Cyberslacking, Day One Christian Ministries, Double burden, Eight-hour day, Feria, Flexplace, Forty-Hour Week Convention, 1935, Four-day week, Hot racking, Hours of Work (Coal Mines) Convention (Revised), 1935, Hours of Work (Coal Mines) Convention, 1931, Hours of Work (Commerce and Offices) Convention, 1930, Hours of Work (Industry) Convention, 1919, Hours of Work and Rest Periods (Road Transport) Convention, 1939 (shelved), Hours of Work and Rest Periods (Road Transport) Convention, 1979, Job sharing, Karo¯shi, Labour Code, Labour law, Labour market flexibility, Long weekend, Medical resident work hours, Money-rich, time-poor, Night Work Conventions, Nonsabbatarianism, Overtime, Overtime rate, Presenteeism, Reduction of Hours of Work (Glass-Bottle Works) Convention, 1935 (shelved), Reduction of Hours of Work (Public Works) Convention, 1936, Reduction of Hours of Work (Textiles) Convention, 1937, Retroactive overtime, ROWE, Sabbath, Saint Monday, Seafarers' Hours of Work and the Manning of Ships Convention, 1996, Shabbat, Sheet-Glass Works Convention, 1934 (shelved), Shift work, Stopping the clock, Sunday Trading Act 1994, Sunday Working (Scotland) Act 2003, Superwoman (sociology), Telecommuting, Telework Association, TGIF, Time and attendance, Time clock, Time-and-a-half, Conventions concerning Wages, Hours of Work on Board Ship and Manning, Waiting for the Weekend, Watch system, Weekly Rest (Commerce and Offices) Convention, 1957, Weekly Rest (Industry) Convention, 1921, Work at home parent, Work ethic, Work-leisure dichotomy, Work-life balance, Workaholic, Working time, Working Time Directive, Workweek and weekend, Work-life balance (United States), Zero-hour contract.

This book explains in-depth the real drivers and workings of Introducing Flexible Working into Your Organization. It reduces the risk of your time and resources investment decisions by enabling you to compare your understanding of Introducing Flexible Working into Your Organization with the objectivity of experienced professionals.

Unique, authoritative, and wide-ranging, it offers practical and strategic advice for managers, business owners and students worldwide.

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